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North Staffordshire CCG

NHS Urges Public To Get Essential Vaccines Despite Coronavirus Outbreak

NHS England is urging people to attend all regular vaccination appointments to prevent outbreaks of serious diseases and reduce pressure on the health service.

The NHS is continuing to help people to manage illness linked to coronavirus, but is still urging parents to bring children forward for lifesaving jabs to stop killer diseases like measles and mumps.

Essential, routine vaccinations like the MMR jab can save a child’s life and are available through family doctors, including in some parts of the country through new children’s immunisation drive-through clinics.

As long as those attending appointments, including parents of babies or children, do not have symptoms or are not self-isolating because someone in the household is displaying symptoms, all scheduled vaccinations should go ahead as normal.

With many people expressing concern and even fear about seeking help during the virus emergency, the NHS is running a nationwide campaign to encourage people to come forward for help when they need it.

Dr Nikita Kanani, NHS England Medical Director for Primary Care, said: "Vaccines are an absolutely essential building block of good health, so if you or any member of your household are not displaying symptoms of coronavirus and are not self-isolating, vaccinations should happen as normal.

"While the NHS is taking unprecedented measures to protect people from coronavirus, local services are working hard to ensure that people including babies, children and pregnant women still receive their routine vaccinations - they provide essential protection against potentially life-threatening diseases."

The national immunisation programme is highly successful in reducing the number of serious and life-threatening diseases such as whooping cough, diphtheria and measles.

High vaccine uptake can prevent a resurgence of infections, which can cause harm and put unnecessary added pressure on the NHS.

Despite a sustained push from the NHS and partner organisations, the influence of so-called antivaxxers is thought to have played a part in a decline in uptake for the MMR jab in recent years.

Public Health Minister Jo Churchill said: "Vaccines help protect all of us from preventable outbreaks of infectious diseases like measles which can have devastating consequences.

"Children should continue to go to their routine vaccination appointments when they are invited by their GP. If you need to visit your GP, parents should be reassured that going to a medical appointment is classed as essential travel as long as no one in the household is displaying COVID-19 symptoms."

When attending appointments, people should follow government guidance and ensure they are two metres apart from anyone outside their household and minimise time spent outside.

If a patient or a member of their household develops coronavirus symptoms, they should follow government guidance and reschedule their appointment.

If individuals or members of a household need advice from a GP practice about symptoms not related to coronavirus, they should contact the practice online or by phone to be assessed.

Dr Mary Ramsay, Head of Immunisations at Public Health England, said: "The national immunisation programme remains in place to protect the nation’s health and no one should be in any doubt of the devastating impact of diseases such as measles, meningitis and pneumonia.

"During this time, it is important to maintain the best possible vaccine uptake to prevent a resurgence of these infections."

Parents are advised to do this if their children have symptoms of scarlet fever as we reach the peak season between late March and mid-April. Symptoms of this include a rash, sore throat, headache and fever.

Scarlet fever mainly infects children and is most common between the ages of 2 and 8 years. It was once a very dangerous infection but has now become much less serious, with antibiotic treatment now available to minimise the risk of complications, however there is currently no vaccine.

A full list of vaccinations and when they are available, for children and adults, is accessible through the NHS website.

NHS Urges Public To Get Essential Vaccines Despite Coronavirus Outbreak

NHS England is urging people to attend all regular vaccination appointments to prevent outbreaks of serious diseases and reduce pressure on the health service.

The NHS is continuing to help people to manage illness linked to coronavirus, but is still urging parents to bring children forward for lifesaving jabs to stop killer diseases like measles and mumps.

Essential, routine vaccinations like the MMR jab can save a child’s life and are available through family doctors, including in some parts of the country through new children’s immunisation drive-through clinics.

As long as those attending appointments, including parents of babies or children, do not have symptoms or are not self-isolating because someone in the household is displaying symptoms, all scheduled vaccinations should go ahead as normal.

With many people expressing concern and even fear about seeking help during the virus emergency, the NHS is running a nationwide campaign to encourage people to come forward for help when they need it.

Dr Nikita Kanani, NHS England Medical Director for Primary Care, said: "Vaccines are an absolutely essential building block of good health, so if you or any member of your household are not displaying symptoms of coronavirus and are not self-isolating, vaccinations should happen as normal.

"While the NHS is taking unprecedented measures to protect people from coronavirus, local services are working hard to ensure that people including babies, children and pregnant women still receive their routine vaccinations - they provide essential protection against potentially life-threatening diseases."

The national immunisation programme is highly successful in reducing the number of serious and life-threatening diseases such as whooping cough, diphtheria and measles.

High vaccine uptake can prevent a resurgence of infections, which can cause harm and put unnecessary added pressure on the NHS.

Despite a sustained push from the NHS and partner organisations, the influence of so-called antivaxxers is thought to have played a part in a decline in uptake for the MMR jab in recent years.

Public Health Minister Jo Churchill said: "Vaccines help protect all of us from preventable outbreaks of infectious diseases like measles which can have devastating consequences.

"Children should continue to go to their routine vaccination appointments when they are invited by their GP. If you need to visit your GP, parents should be reassured that going to a medical appointment is classed as essential travel as long as no one in the household is displaying COVID-19 symptoms."

When attending appointments, people should follow government guidance and ensure they are two metres apart from anyone outside their household and minimise time spent outside.

If a patient or a member of their household develops coronavirus symptoms, they should follow government guidance and reschedule their appointment.

If individuals or members of a household need advice from a GP practice about symptoms not related to coronavirus, they should contact the practice online or by phone to be assessed.

Dr Mary Ramsay, Head of Immunisations at Public Health England, said: "The national immunisation programme remains in place to protect the nation’s health and no one should be in any doubt of the devastating impact of diseases such as measles, meningitis and pneumonia.

"During this time, it is important to maintain the best possible vaccine uptake to prevent a resurgence of these infections."

Parents are advised to do this if their children have symptoms of scarlet fever as we reach the peak season between late March and mid-April. Symptoms of this include a rash, sore throat, headache and fever.

Scarlet fever mainly infects children and is most common between the ages of 2 and 8 years. It was once a very dangerous infection but has now become much less serious, with antibiotic treatment now available to minimise the risk of complications, however there is currently no vaccine.

A full list of vaccinations and when they are available, for children and adults, is accessible through the NHS website.

NHS Clinical Commissioners to make a decision on the Future of Local Health Services in North Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent

The Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in North Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent are holding an Extra-Ordinary Governing Body Meeting to make a decision on the Future of Local Health Services.

The meeting will be held in public from 2pm to 5pm on Tuesday 21st January at the Moat House Hotel in Stoke-on-Trent.

The CCGs will be considering the Decision-Making Business Case (DMBC), which has been developed to help the decision-making process. The DMBC has been created since the CCGs met in June 2019 to consider feedback from the 14-week public consultation that was held between December 2018 and March 2019.

Members of the public are invited to attend but are asked to register in advance as places are limited.

If you would like to attend this meeting please complete this registration form : http://bit.ly/FutureLocalHealth

Papers for the meeting can be found here

More information on the DMBC can be found here.

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NHS Constitution - pdf the NHS belongs to us all (526 KB)


Together We’re Better -Together We’re Better is your partnership of local NHS provider trusts, CCGs, local government organisations and independent and voluntary sector groups that is working together to transform health and care services in Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent. Through a series of clinically-led work programmes, the partnership has been working together to identify areas of innovation, integration and, most importantly deliver better and more joined up care for patients to achieve its vision of ‘Working with you to make Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent the healthiest places to live and work’. For more information about Together We’re Better, visit www.twbstaffsandstoke.org.uk


September 2018 E-Bulletin from National Association for Patient Participation E-Bulletin from National Association for Patient Participation Issue Number 132 containing latest NAPP news and diary updates.


Patient participation in primary care: Why is it important? - A paper clarifying the importance to GPs of involving patients in the wider aspects of the organisation of health care, as well as in their personal care, and demonstrates why GPs need to work with the patients in their practice in order to fulfil aspects of the GP curriculum and revalidation. The article explains how successful collaborative working between patients, GPs and the practices can be achieved for the considerable benefit of all.  Follow the link to download the full document.


Dedicated LPC patient facing website - A dedicated website has been created to keep patients and the public up to date with information about local pharmacies. The website has been created by Staffordshire and Stoke Pharmacies and provides useful information about services available from your pharmacies across Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent.

You can visit the website to find out about the different members of staff you might meet in your local pharmacy, the general services they provide and also information about some of the more special services now being offered.

There is a link for you to contact Staffordshire and Stoke Pharmacies directly if you have any queries or comments about the services you have received.

To visit the website - https://staffsandstokepharmacies.co.uk/


New GP Online Services guide for - Patient Participation Groups members - A new guide has been created to help Patient and Participation Group (PPG) members support their GP practices in encouraging patients to sign up for GP Online Services. The guide - Patient Participation Groups: What you need to know about GP Online Services gives ideas and tips that PPG members can use to support their GP practices, as well as resources, to help promote the use of GP Online Services. It also provides more information on how practices can register patients to use online services and help relieve some of the pressure on staff. 


New GP Online Services practice guide for the flu season - A new flu guide has been launched by NHS England Primary Care Digital Transformation to support GP practice staff in encouraging their patients to register and book their flu clinic online this autumn and winter.The guide- Flu Season: Making the most of online appointments includes information on how flu clinics can be used to register patients for online as well as providing information and links to further resources on the wider benefits of GP Online Services for both patients and practices. CCGs will wish to cascade this to GP Practices in their area.

PPG members pack - Moorland Medical PPG have been working on a PPG members pack which can be accessed by following the link and modified to suit your own PPG. The Key document follows the 4 areas from the NAPP Building Better Participation document.


Booking Community Fire Station Rooms for meetings

Telephone numbers to book a meeting room at Community Fire Stations - 

  • Newcastle Community Fire Station ring 01785 898897
  • Hanley Community Fire Station ring 01785 898760
  • Leek Community Fire Station ring 01785 898501

Patient Leaflet – what happens when you are referred by your GP to see a Specialist? NHS England, together with the British Medical Association and the National Association for Patient Participation, have produced a leaflet for patients to understand what they can expect if they are referred by their GP to see a specialist or consultant at a hospital or a community health centre. Follow this link to access the leaflet.


How does the NHS in England Work - an alternative guide a whistle-stop tour from the Kings Fund of how the NHS works in 2017 and how it is changing

 

 

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